Matienzo July/August 2013, Pt 1

After not achieving what we wanted on our last visit the two of us are back for more, firm in our belief that we will make progress, hopefully. With unusually hot weather in the UK we are a bit worried about how hot it will get here, in fact we have already seen our first bush fire. It was a small fire but such things can turn into big fires.

Wild Mare entrance in the dry
Wild Mare entrance in the dry

Having arrived at midday on Sunday we went around saying hello to various people and somehow ended up in the same bar that served us such interesting soup at the end of our last visit. We didn’t eat.

Wild Mare entrance looking out at the hot weather
Wild Mare entrance looking out at the hot weather

Today we shifted all the dive kit into Wild Mare cave. Water levels are unsurprising low, both out and in the cave, so we are able to use the far dive base. Diving through sump of the wild eels in clear viz was a pleasure. Spread across the floor of the sump, on top of the silt layer, was some sort of growth pattern with small tendrils standing up between 5 and 10 mm high. After surfacing and clambering around in the rifts the ladder was rigged down through the breakthrough window. We recovered the kit that had been left behind last time and all was well. We then went on to look at the water in AGM bypass. It was clear, crystal clear. Prospects look good for tomorrow.

Jim, up in the rifts above the line for uninspiring sump
Jim, up in the rifts above the line for uninspiring sump

Matienzo epilogue

What follows was an email I sent to Pete, he thinks it will make a good blog post, I am not so sure. So, if you are in any way offended, upset or put off your dinner by this post please contact Tish who will no doubt deal with Pete in the correct manner.

So on our last day the ferry doesn’t leave until 8pm and we had to be out of the flat for midday. We drove around looking at sites and overflowing, muddy rivers. We stopped at a bar for food, our Spanish isn’t quite up to the job but we got the message across between the two of us using a mixture of Spanish words and animal noises. We ordered soup followed by steak. When the soup arrived we looked at it and it looked back. We understand now that a Spanish waitress will laugh when an English person orders ‘traditional mountain soup’ – it’s made from the soft bits of a sheep skull (all of them).

And Pete, I can only apologize for the lack of photographs in this post.